Increase your range of movement and enhance your athletic performance with massage therapy!


Increase your range of motion for a better workoutWhether we like it or not in the natural process of ageing, joints tighten, range of motion and flexibility can be lost; this can limit your workouts from reaching desired goals and gaining optimal performance.  You can stretch, a very important addition to your routine but scar tissue, adhesion can limit the effects here as well. What If you found a treatment source that not only improves the range of motion but has other long-lasting benefits and results.

Apart from injury how do you lose Range of motion?  You are either toning or building muscle to strengthen your body, imagine during this phase the “tearing down” in strengthening muscle, your body adapts in this process this can often involve stiffness and soreness, especially when the amount of movement is significantly increased from what the body is used to in the past.

Delayed soreness (24-48hrs after exercise) can be caused by minor muscle or connective tissue damage, local muscle spasm, reduce blood flow and a buildup of waste products develop over time from the stress and strain of heavy physical exertion or from repeated use of a particular muscle.

Trigger points or stress points (tender nodules in specific spots in the muscle) that decrease blood flow “ischemia” causing pain, soreness and decrease flexibility. Heavily exercised muscles may also lose their capacity to relax, causing chronically tight muscles, and lose flexibility.

This lack of flexibility is often linked to muscle soreness, and predisposes you to injuries, especially muscle pulls and tears.

What is the treatment with long-lasting benefits?  Massage is an effective treatment for increasing and maintaining flexibility and motion, how do you ask? By improving circulation, which nourishes cells and improve waste elimination, relieve tight muscles that are knotted up, reduce adhesions, release any nerve compression that can cause other problems that you don’t want to live with, providing you with physical relaxation for enhanced energy and vitality.

If you haven’t tried massage or hesitate consider this if you are a coach, athlete, power lifter or just starting on the road to an active lifestyle increasing your range of movement can enhance your athletic performance and prevent injuries keeping your body flexible?

Our knowledge increases everyday on how our body works,  evidence-based research has found massage to increase and improve range of motion, a study published in the academic Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research shows that short, targeted massage therapy sessions can increase an individual’s range of motion.

Completed in January 2000 by the Touch Research Institute in conjunction with the University of Miami School of Medicine and Iris Burman of Educating Hands, and was first published in the International Journal of Neuroscience, the participants’ range of motion in their hips increased by 7.2 percent after receiving a 30-second massage, 5.9 percent after receiving a 10-second massage, a notable impact considering the short duration of the massage sessions.

How it helps, by working on muscles, connective tissue, tendons, ligaments, and joints, massage can stimulate the production and retention of our bodies’ natural lubricants between the connective tissue fibers, making stretching and movement easier, and keeping the body flexible. Some forms of massage like Neuromuscular Therapy can help heal scar tissue as well as tendon, ligament, and muscle tears.

Confused on what form of massage therapy to choose from?  So many to choose from and so little time, ask your therapist about their education and what they use in their treatment sessions. if you haven’t found a therapist and need some help finding one here a couple of links to help you locate one near you.

American Massage Therapy Association
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals

Because I practice what I preach I also use massage therapy on a regular basis for my treatments. The form I use and recommend is,  Neuromuscular therapy (NMT) also known as trigger point myotherapy. The American Academy of pain management recognizes this form of massage therapy as an effective treatment source.

I could be biased because my extensive training is in Neuromuscular Therapy but I have seen and heard from my clients how their lives improved with treatment. I also practice yoga and I am lucky enough to have found a NMT therapist and in my own experience find that after each session I gain more flexibility that helps me reach my goal in perfecting each yoga pose.

This treatment not only helps scar tissue, reduce adhesion and re-educate your muscles but by working with you a unique individual and assessing your motion and posture restriction are removed and pain relieved an important strategy to your treatment plan to retrain posture and motion patterns to keep you moving well. And moving well is key to aging well….

Your story can be of help to someone else so feel free to share by leaving a comment on your experience with massage or what has helped your range of motion and flexibility. If you found this information helpful please consider following on www.facebook.com/maraiwantamassage for helpful tips on improving your posture. For more articles like this join my blog.

Thanks for sharing!

Mara Nicandro NMT
www.Mara.IwantaMassage.com

www.facebook.com/maraiwantamassage
www.twitter.com/maranicandronmt

Resources: Touch Research Institute. Originally reported in International Journal of Neuroscience, 2001, Vol. 106, pp. 131-145.

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