Who suffers? Runners, Walkers, Football players, cashiers, hairdressers, postal workers, factory workers, nurses


www.mara.iwantamassage.comYour doctor has diagnosed your foot pain to be “Plantar Fasciitis” if you are suffering from this condition unfortunately, it means you’re dealing with inflammation that may need lot’s of time to heal.  What is it? Plantar fascia is a thin band of fibrous tissue that runs from the heel bone to the base of the toes.  The inflammation  and tenderness to the touch comes from the deeper soft tissue structures and cause the actual pain.

The cause range from sudden increases in physical activity, being overweight, weak foot muscles, restrictions in tissues from the foot to the hamstrings, repetitive motions that stress the feet and the legs, standing on hard surfaces for a long period of time, existing muscle imbalances,  increased physical activity, shoes that don’t provide arch support, flat or excessively high arches, acute trauma to the feet.

As the result of these repeated stresses, the surrounding area develops micro-tears and becomes inflamed and irritated. We have to walk and continue to do our usual routines so the lack of time and opportunity to heal properly keeps it irritated. The fascia gets tighter and tighter, and forgets how to be in a normal relaxed state. Adhesions and scar tissue build up. Without treatment, the cycle merely repeats over and over, until the pain is almost unbearable.

How therapeutic massage helps? Because tension is the main problem, in many cases all that is needed to get out of pain and on the way to recovery is to relax the muscles that control the foot.

While the focus is on your foot pain,  what is happening to your calf muscles, hamstrings your hips? You guessed it! Compensation and possibly more pain in other areas of the body. Unbalanced gate (how you walk) creates a biomechanical dysfunction in the lower half of your body.

Calf Muscle should be massaged

So it’s a good idea to treat the additional structures and address the dysfunction to prevent a recurrence once you healed.  I like to work on the entire sole of the foot, as well as the muscles in the back of the calf.  If treatment calls for it I will do a gentle decompression of the ankle.

Some of these muscles insert on the sole of the foot and contribute to the problem when they are tight. A well-trained or experienced Massage Therapist should be able to treat the symptoms, and to recommend exercises to help prevent recurrences, as well as help the condition to subside.

Who suffers? Runners, Walkers, Football players, cashiers, hairdressers, postal workers, factory workers, nurses

How do you prevent it from happening? By losing weight, wearing the proper shoes and making changes in your lifestyle, you can decrease your risk of developing this sharp heel pain.

Once you have it here are a few Self help tips to help manage the pain:

1. Apply ice to help reduce pain and inflammation. Cold therapy can be applied regularly until symptoms have resolved. 

2. Stretching  is an important part of treatment and prevention. Simply reducing pain and inflammation alone is unlikely to result in long-term recovery. The plantar fascia tightens up making the origin at the heel more susceptible to stress.

3. According to www.massagemag.com new research shows using a medial arch support helps manage pain and pain-related disability associated with plantar fasciitis. Plantar Fasciitis Responds to Medial Arch Support.

4. Rolling the can, this is especially effective when you first wake up and get out of bed. Your feet may feel too sensitive for walking.

What you will need:
Sturdy tin can or a water bottle (if it’s cold even better) or a tennis ball.

The exercise:
1. Sit on a chair or on the side of your bed
2. Place your affected foot on the can or ball
3. Gently roll the can back and forth under your foot. Roll from the balls of your feet to the back of the heel.
4. Repeat this exercise 15 times without pausing.
5. repeat this exercise with the other foot for balance.

This is a home-made video demonstrating using a Tennis ball. If you liked this article please consider sharing it and rating it. Would you like to be notified of new updates and current news subscribe, I appreciate your comments on how you liked the article. Thanks, Mara Nicandro LMT, NMT, MMT of www.mara.iwantamassage.com

This information is for educational purpose only please consult your doctor for questions about your health.

References: Release your pain, Dr. Brian Abelson, DC, Kamalis Abelson, Bsc

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20 thoughts on “Who suffers? Runners, Walkers, Football players, cashiers, hairdressers, postal workers, factory workers, nurses

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  3. Admiring the commitment you put into your blog and detailed information you present. It’s good to come across a blog every once in a while that isn’t the same unwanted rehashed material. Wonderful read! I’ve bookmarked your site and I’m adding your RSS feeds to my Google account.

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